In September 2005 David in San Diego, California contacted me with information on his 1965 Cheoy Lee Frisco Flyer III. He wrote that this was his third Cheoy Lee. He shared the story of his previous Cheoy Lees:

  1. CL#1. His brother-in-law found a Frisco flyer in Massachusetts covered with 6 inches of paint. His then 74-year old retired father-in-law, a Portuguese carpenter (Mannie), restored it. It was beautiful. He sailed her for 2 years, then a storm tore her loose from her mooring in Buzzards Bay, and she was destroyed.
  2. CL#2. He found another one in San Francisco, trucked it across the country, where his father-in-law restored it. Then, in the same spot, at a different mooring, a storm came through and destroyed the boat (same rocks). He added that his brother-in-law was responsible for not checking the mooring; he’s not happy with his brother-in-law.
  3. CL#3. Now he’s just bought his 3rd Cheoy Lee, and is keeping her in California, where his brother-in-law cannot get to her. Mannie, his father-in-law (now 84), in a state of shock, arrived from Massachusetts in November, 2005, to begin yet another restoration.

David has been working on stripping the mast which someone had painted white. He wrote that he’d also been doing some work on the decks, replacing bungs and correcting some prior owner issues. He sent this picture of himself working on the mast.

David working on the mast

David working on the mast

He submitted some exterior photos. There are some noticeable differences between this CL model and the Cadet: there are no dorades; the mast step and base cap is one solid piece; glassed hatches instead of plank. This boat has some beautiful house paneling.

beautiful house paneling  no dorades

David sent one interior picture. It shows an opening port in the main cabin and it almost looks as if the bulkhead was positioned farther forward than in my model.

an interior picture

an interior picture

In November 2005 David wrote and informed me that Mannie has completed the new teak cockpit grates and refinished the lids of all the cockpit lockers.

He is now starting to replace the missing teak bungs, which requires removing all the machine screws, about half of which break off when turned.

In February 2006 David wrote to say that he too was feeling the need to order a new manufacturer’s plate for his Frisco Flyer and had contacted Jonathan Cannon in Hong Kong toward that end. He told me that he had tried to clean his to no avail. This is the picture he sent along.

David’s plaque  the pitting in the plaque

The previous owner had caulked over all missing bungs, which was unacceptable to David. He hoped the remaining boards were thick enough to be re-drilled and countersunk for new bungs.

David was missing the dragon carving (but had one off one of the previous boats) and the dorade boxes (he wasn’t sure they came on this model but he likes them.)

He sent a picture along of his Dad who’s been doing quite a bit of the work, I take it:

David with his Dad

David with his Dad

He pointed out the new boards in the coaming, and says he’ll be installing the dragon carving next week.

David’s dragon carving  the dragons he wants to install

In October 2006 David wrote that he had finished the outside cabin work. He had stripped off all the old varnish, coated the wood with three coats of Cetol followed by two coats of Cetol gloss, and was pretty happy of with the results.

Mannie had carved him a sign for the transom, including some hummingbirds (the boat name is colabri, Spanish for hummingbird).

a name board for David’s Frisco Flyer

a name board for David’s Frisco Flyer

He had also carved two signs for the boat registration numbers. He wrote that he had ripped out and refinished the sole, and repaired the rudder with new stainless reinforcement bars, then recoated it with fiberglass. He also installed dorade boxes and two new portlights that he had salvaged from his brother-in-law’s wreck. He felt he now needed to start the painting of the hull and finishing the interior work after which the boat would get launched.

Mannie has also worked his magic in a few other places:

he carved this interior hummingbird plaque  he carved the sides for these blocks

In August 2008 David wrote that Mannie had built a new forward hatch skylight for the boat. He added that he’d been out sailing with his new red tanbark sails from Porpoise Sailing.

the skylight that Mannie built

the skylight that Mannie built

In September 2008 David sent these pictures of his sails:

David out sailing  his new tanbark sails